Using design elements and test data from the Abyss Concept prototype that Ming released last year, this month the young Singaporean-based watchmaker released its first production dive watch.

The Ming 18.01 H41 comes with a larger grade 5 titanium case, a matching titanium bracelet, with ceramic luminous material embedded in the sapphire dial ring. Surrounding the dial is a DLC-coated 60 click monoblock stainless steel unidirectional bezel that’s delineated by a 15-minute graduation as well as being able to count up to 60. The bezel features lume for all markings, moreover, everything on the dial that’s white is luminous.

Ming 18.01 H41

While the 40 mm diameter case is only 12.9 mm thick, the company was able to achieve a 1,000-meter depth rating. Multiple sets of gaskets and seals (including triple gaskets and red safety indicator for the crown) help to achieve the impressive water-resistance rating, ten times the ISO 6425 standard of 100 meters. Interestingly, the caseback has a high-friction surface to better grip your arm or wetsuit and prevent movement. Ming 18.01 H41

The head (the case without a strap or bracelet) weighs just 65 grams. Conveniently, the bracelet has curved quick-release end bars (20 mm) that will fit all of our previous watches, and will also be available separately.

Ming 18.01 H41 DLC

Driving the hours, minutes, and center seconds is an outsourced top-grade ETA 2824-2 automatic that has 24 jewels, beats at 4Hz, has 40-hours of power reserve, and that’s been modified to remove the calendar and intermediate hand setting positions. The movement has been adjusted to five positions.

Ming 18.01 H41

There are three variants: a two-tone DLC and titanium on black Jean Rousseau rubber strap, two-tone DLC and titanium on a titanium bracelet, and full DLC-coated titanium on black rubber (with gloss black lacquer dial).

Retail starts at $2,750. Learn more at Ming.

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.