At the annual Geneva Watch Show (SIHH) last week, Officine Panerai debuted a new set of watches inspired by two pre-Vendôme era references, from the early days when Panerai was acquired by Vendôme, part of the Richemont Group, in 1997.

According to Officine Panerai, “in 1996 Panerai made a few small series of watches commissioned by Sylvester Stallone. The new Luminor 8 Days Set takes two models originally created for he American actor: a Luminor Black Seal, here presented for the first time in a left-handed version, and a Luminor Daylight with an original, extremely rare white dial with blue markers and numerals. The two watches are supplied in a box inspired by those used for vintage Luminor watches, made of pear wood with a teak base and containing a model of the human torpedo (Siluro a Lenta Corsa – slow-speed torpedo), together with a rare publication about the military equipment of the special forces of the Royal Italian Navy, in which Panerai watches and instruments appear.”

The Luminor 8 Days Set (Ref. PAM00786) comes with two 44 mm diameter timepieces: the Luminor Black Seal in black DLC coated stainless steel with a left-hand crown, and the Luminor Daylight with a rare white dial and blue markers and numerals. Each of the watches is powered by hand-wound manufacture movement (caliber P.5000) with a power reserve of 8 days, stored in two spring barrels connected in series.

The set includes the Luminor Daylight 8 Days Acciaio and Luminor Black Seal Left-Handed 8 Days Acciaio DLC. Both watches are water-resistant to 30 meters and are presented in a special pear wood box with a teak base, a model of a human torpedo (Siluro a Lenta Corsa – slow-speed torpedo), as well as a spare strap for each model and a screwdriver. Limited to 500 sets.

Hands-On Photos by Josh Shanks.

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.