Originally introduced in 2009, Girard-Perregaux will announce a new rose gold and ruthenium version of the 1966 Annual Calendar and Equation of Time at SIHH 2012.

The Annual Calendar and Equation of Time comes in a 40 mm diameter by 10.72 mm thick rose gold case. Functions include hours, minutes, small seconds, annual calendar and equation of time. The annual calendar complication displays the date (at 2 o’clock) and month (at 7 o’clock) and must be corrected only once per year (February). The equation of time complication calculates the difference between apparent solar time and solar mean time, indicated by a retrograde display between 4 and 5 o’clock.

The length of a solar day varies daily, due to the elliptical shape of the Earth’s orbit. This astronomical complication is based on a mechanism incorporating an annual disc with an elliptical cam that reproduces the Earth’s movement around the Sun.

The grey ruthenium dial has a subtle sunray-brush, a perfect combination with the pink gold of the case. Pink gold applied hour markers, leaf-shaped hands, GP logo painted in white.

The Girard-Perregaux in-house automatic movement, caliber GP 033M0 is made of 287 components, 44 jewels, runs at 28,800 vph (4 Hz) and has a power reserve 46-hours. GP in-house developed Microvar inertia balance wheel (pictured). It has six (7.18 mm) adjustable gold regulating balance screws and two inertia-blocks on its rim, used to set the equilibrium and enable fine adjustment of the movement, thus enhancing the precision of the timepiece during adjustment.

Hand-finishing of movement includes a rhodium-plated main plate with circular-graining above and below, diamond-cut facets. The barrel has snailing on the cover and sunray-brushing on the underside. The gear train bridge is polished with diamond-cut facets, circular-grained on the underside, drawn sides, diamond-cut recesses, Côtes de Genève and “Girard-Perregaux eagle” engraving. The oscillating weight is pink gold with circular Côtes de Genève. Gear-train has gilded 2N18 wheels, burnished pivots, circular-grained sides.

The stunning new dial and pink gold case combination should make an already popular timepiece, that much more appealing.

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.