Pennsylvania-based RGM Watch Co. founder Roland Murphy recently produced a one-off timepiece called the Model 25 “Terra Nova” — with an interesting source of inspiration for the dial and caseback.

Presented in an American made 40 mm x 10.4 mm stainless steel Model 25 case with coin edges, a contoured bezel, and curved lugs — the Terra Nova has classic proportions with modern ergonomics.

The dial is also a classical design with a Breguet-style silver frosted guilloché chapter ring with black printed Roman numeral hour markers. The outermost portion of the ring indicates minutes and seconds via black printed dots. And the brand name is printed in black on a tab at 12 o’clock that’s also part of the silvered frosted dial ring.

RGM Terra Nova
RGM Model 25 “Terra Nova”

The hour, minute, and second hands are heat blued, and there’s no date (but the Model 25 series can be ordered with or without date). Driving the hands is a 4Hz Swiss made, 23-jewel, automatic movement with a Rhodium finish, Geneva stripes, perlage, and with a solid gold rotor made by RGM.

RGM Model 25 "Terra Nova" caseback
RGM Model 25 “Terra Nova” caseback

In the center is a gorgeous hand-painted image depicting the 1910-1913 expedition to Antarctica by Robert Falcon Scott aboard the Terra Nova. On the solid caseback, is an engraved version of the map that plots the expedition. You can read more about Murphy’s interest in the story of the Terra Nova and expedition by Scott and how it inspired the watch design.

RGM Terra Nova dial creation
RGM Terra Nova dial creation

The watch weighs 70.87 grams, is rated to 50 meters of water-resistance, and retails for $13,900. While it was created as a one-of-a-kind timepiece and has already been sold — RGM will consider we might make one or two more of them. Or you can always commission something else custom.

Learn more at RGM Watch Co.

Photo of Terra Nova in Antarctica 1913
Geologist Thomas Griffith Taylor and meteorologist Charles Wright look out towards the Terra Nova from inside an ice grotto. Photo by Herbert Ponting/Scott Polar Research Institue, University of Cambridge/Getty Images
Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

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