First introduced earlier this year with a Blackor Griffe fumé dial, the Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph is now also available with a Funky Blue fumé dial.

The name “Streamliner” is a reference to high-speed trains from the 1920s and 30s and like the first model, this second iteration has the same 42.3 mm diameter cushion-shaped stainless steel case with what the company describes as a “fluid steel” integrated bracelet. The bracelet is articulated and features a “gentle wave-like appearance” with vertical brushing on the main surfaces combined with polished accents on the edges.

Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Funky Blue Fumé

A thick domed sapphire sits on the front and is subtly curved to match the slightly curved dial and hands. Water-resistant is 120 meters.

Like the case, the Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Automatic Funky Blue Fumé dial retains the existing Flyback Chronograph made by Agenhor. In fact, everything is the same except the dial (and the price).

Moser has impressive in-house manufacturing capabilities but for this complicated chronograph, Agenhor manufactured and designed the movement, which is also used by Singer and Fabergé — and that’s currently semi-exclusive to this trio of watchmakers. Chronographs are one of most difficult types of movements to manufacturer and so many manufactures avoid creating these in-house due to cost and complexity, although Moser did help with this, to some extent.

Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Funky Blue

Despite the appearance of a manual wind caliber, this is an automatic and that plus the complicated integrated flyback chronograph, take up a space of 34.4 mm x 7.3 mm. Beating at 3Hz, there are 434 total components, 55 jewels, and a small tungsten  weight — hidden between the movement and the dial — that winds the dual mainsprings, while oscillating in either direction, and can store a maximum 54-hours of power reserve. As you can see, and as you would expect at this price point, all visible components have been expertly finished, including striping, anglage, and polishing.

Notably, the caliber HMC 902, as Moser calls it, represents the first automatic chronograph with a central elapsed minutes and seconds display with is equipped with a flyback function on the minutes and seconds. To achieve this the movement was designed with a two-stage chronograph mechanism featuring a column wheel configuration and a horizontal clutch that’s equipped with micro-teeth to avoid any issues when the teeth intermesh and reduce unwanted jerks when starting the chronograph, and a tulip yoke allowing the chronograph to be triggered or released.

Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Funky Blue

Surrounding the dial is a bezel that’s been intricately sunray brushed by hand, with polished edges that go with the same flow as the bracelet. Further separating this look from others are case flanks that have been hollowed on each side.

Around the edge of the dial, is a printed white and red chapter ring, with hash marked delineations for the seconds on the outermost portion, and indices plus Arabic numerals for the minutes. On the flange, is a printed tachymeter scale. An applied Arabic numeral “60” sits at the top of the dial, keeping the focus on the minutes and chronograph, versus the time of the day.

Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Funky Blue

The hands were designed like those found in car instruments, including double needle-shaped hands: one for the chronograph seconds (red) and one for chronograph minutes (rhodium-plated).

Interestingly, the lume used on the hands features a new formula that includes a ceramic based material, which helps punctuate the beautifully faded Funky Blue fumé dial. The new H. Moser Streamliner Flyback Chronograph Funky Blue (Ref. 6902-1201) retails for $43,900 and will be available for sale at Moser and authorized retailers.

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.