Christopher Ward debuted a new chronograph today —  featuring a retro design and bi-compax dial layout.

The C65 Chronograph comes in a 41 mm x 15 mm stainless steel case with a 47.1 mm lug-to-lug measurement and a 22 mm interlug width. At launch, the watch is available with a brushed blue dial with white stamped azurage subdials at 3 and 9 o’clock. The 30-minute chronograph counter has a regatta-style color scheme and has the first ten minutes divided into two five-minute segments.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph Steel baton-shaped hour and minute hands, along with the running small seconds counter, display the time. A bright orange needle-shaped hand indicates the chronograph seconds. The date is shown through an aperture at 6 o’clock.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

A box-type sapphire crystal protects the dial, and the unidirectional rotating steel bezel features a blue aluminum insert marked with 0-60.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

While this is not a dive watch, the crown and pushers are screwed-down and the caseback features a sapphire crystal that’s also screwed-in. Water-resistance is rated down to 150 meters.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Driving the hours, minutes, small seconds, date, and chronograph is an outsourced Sellita SW510 that beats at 4Hz, has 27 jewels, with a power reserve of 48-hours. The movement has not been highly adjusted considering the stated rate of -20/+20 seconds per day, versus -4/+6 for a chronometer. The SW510 has hacking seconds and the rotor has been customized with a repeating twin-flag engraved motif over a Colimaçoné finish.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Each C65 Chronograph watch comes with a unique engraved serial number. The retail is $1,900 on a black or brown leather strap, or a black tropical rubber strap, and $2,055 with a stainless steel bracelet.

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Christopher Ward C65 Chronograph

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.