On March 8th at Baselworld 2012, British watch brand Bremont will present the World Timer ALT1-WT. The ALT1-WT is based on the C-17 Globemaster timepiece which was originally commissioned for military use in 2010.

“Design features of the Bremont C-17 include the etched globe on the dial and a Roto-Click bezel that enables the user to work out the global time zones using the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) airfield identifiers. Each identifier represents a C-17 landing location in all 24 time zones. The watch itself can show UTC or ‘Zulu’ time through its adjustable 24-hour hand.”

The civilian ALT1-W1’s special Roto-click internal bezel is operated by the crown at 8’oclock; it uses a mechanism developed by the company (integrating a series of ball-bearings) that allows the user to turn the bezel with a click for each minute.

The case features a Trip-Tick design, which means the steel used in the case construction has been hardened through a series of processes at high temperatures to give it a hardness and scratch resistance of 2000 Vickers. A standard untreated 316L stainless steel watch case will naturally be around 300 Vickers.

The sapphire crystal covering the dial has an astounding nine layers of anti-reflective treatment on each side of the crystal reducing light reflections on the crystal face by up to 95%. This treatment is specially designed to be as scratch resistant as the sapphire crystal itself.

The movement is an automatic COSC-certified chronometer, caliber BE-54AE, which has been decorated and is visible through a sapphire case back. The watch is presented in a leather travel wallet, hand-made in England, it comes with a strap changing tool and an extra NATO military nylon strap along with the watch’s COSC certification. The retail price is $5,695.

Jason Pitsch
Posted by:Jason Pitsch

Jason Pitsch is the founder and editor of Professional Watches. He appreciates good design and engineering in everything from architecture to automobiles to cameras to clothing. Yet his focus for the past decade has remained consistent on covering just one type of craftsmanship: watchmaking.